King Louie feat. Leek - “Po Up Slow” (2012)

Man, I could listen to Louie rap like this for hours. His voice is mesmerizing:

"I’m a young man with big bank

Need sharks for the fish tank

A new whip for the summer time

My gun name is a number nine

Got a lil hoe on the phone now

Bad bitch on the other line

The money calling me all the time

That’s why I text most of the time”

This has been a very good week for Chicago hip-hop. David mentioned the other day that the bar for him to repost something online has been raised, and I would agree, but I think it’s also luckily the case that almost everyone in Chicago is putting out better stuff than now than they were even a couple of months ago.

Tink - “Fingers Up” (2012)

"Fuck you like a naughty Christian" is such a dope line that I can recommend this video just based on that. But there is also the fact that this song works really well as a song, the fact that Tink effortlessly handles several different flows, and the fact that this video makes her look incredibly cool (Chicago’s answer to Azealia Banks, hopefully?).

Tink is from the south suburb of Calumet City. She’s only 17, but she has one pretty fantastic R&B mixtape from earlier this year (admittedly with a few too many DJ Hustlenomics drops on it, but also with the amazing line “my heels are seven inches/Monday through Sunday/I’m walking to the bank as if I’m Tyra on that runway”), and she’s being managed by Lyrical Eyes, who has a very good track record in Chicago. I could see big things happening for her. Already since this video she dropped a solid freestyle on FakeShoreDrive, so keep your eyes open.

But start here because this is a great video. That’s DGainz on the beat, and also on the couch shredding the guitar, by the way.

aldoushuxtable:

Tomorrow’s cover.
Read the whole piece here. Yung Kyle Kramer doesn’t just cover Keef. He takes a look at the entire wave Chicago rap is riding right now through the eyes of cats like DGainz, SashaGoHard and others. 
Hope you dig it.

I wrote about (almost) everyone in Chicago rap (and talked to most of them here), and, beyond the fact that I want you to read what I wrote, I recommend checking this out simply because it’s a fascinating story and a really great scene coming out of here right now.

aldoushuxtable:

Tomorrow’s cover.

Read the whole piece here. Yung Kyle Kramer doesn’t just cover Keef. He takes a look at the entire wave Chicago rap is riding right now through the eyes of cats like DGainz, SashaGoHard and others. 

Hope you dig it.

I wrote about (almost) everyone in Chicago rap (and talked to most of them here), and, beyond the fact that I want you to read what I wrote, I recommend checking this out simply because it’s a fascinating story and a really great scene coming out of here right now.

Lil Durk - “L’s Anthem”

If you follow rap music closely on the Internet/are from Chicago/fall at the confluence of those two communities you may have noticed that Chicago is having a bit of a street rap boom at the moment, propelled in particular by the artists King Louie and Chief Keef. There are a lot of interesting sub narratives in here — the role of mobile YouTube views in disseminating this music, the insularity of this scene to Chicago high schools, the weird appropriation that happens when a high school hobby turns into something the Fader set is chasing, the story of Chief Keef’s producer, DJ Kenn, who came to the US from Japan five years ago and somehow ended up producing hip-hop tracks for high schoolers on the South Side of Chicago, the proliferation of female rappers in this scene, etc. — but one thing worth stressing, I think, is that there are a lot of artists involved who are not really ready for widespread exposure or even interested in it. DGainz, the producer and videographer whose videos for Keef’s “Bang”, Louie’s “Money Dance”, and Shady’s “Go In” make him kind of the de facto scene spokesman, pointed out in an interview with FakeShoreDrive that “a lot of this stuff is just for fun” (probably something that anyone who likes music would do well to remember). The point being that I’m not sure it’s doing someone like Chief Keef a huge service to be insisting right now that he is ready for big time rap game (although, for better or for worse, he is about to arrive, via a collaborative mixtape with Soulja Boy). As happy as I am for the visibility Keef’s gotten, I’m still not a huge fan of anything he’s put out yet, and I find the aforementioned narratives more interesting than most of the actual music. I think Louie’s fantastic, and he definitely has the most support to break out at the moment, for what it’s worth.

But Lil Durk, who is also definitely making a go of it as far as having a career, may have just made the best actual song to come out of this scene so far. “L’s Anthem” has apparently been getting some radio play on WCGI and Power 92, and I can see it, by virtue of actually having a hook, becoming a legitimate hit, in Chicago at least. Durk seems just a little more developed stylistically than some of his peers, and he has an excellent pop instinct as well as a pretty concerted ambition. So this is me recommending “L’s Anthem”, and, by extension, Lil Durk himself, in case he has been less on your radar than Chief Keef or King Louie.